Fort Marinus

Month: October, 2011

Forgotten Places: St. Joseph’s Byzantine Church

“[C]hurches are not simply gathering places but signify and make visible the Church living in its place, the dwelling of God [...]” – CCC 1180.i   St. Joseph’s Byzantine Rite Catholic Church was completed in 1933 to serve part of Cleveland’s Carpatho-Rusyn population. The Rusyns are an Eastern Slavic ethnic group originally inhabiting the Carpathian [...]

Fort Marinus Owns Chicago

“You can change the rules, but you can’t change history.” – Nike Running.   Fort Marinus’ logo forms part of Nike’s “Own Chicago” Mosaic. It makes up several small tiles in the blue-ish area above the ‘W’. Can you spot them? http://www.facebook.com/nikerunning?sk=app_106056822837554

Forgotten Places: Michigan Central Station

“Because it’s there.” – G. H. Mallory, when asked why he wanted to climb Mount Everest.   Michigan Central Station, built in 1913 for the Michigan Central Railroad, was Detroit’s passenger rail depot from its opening until Amtrak discontinued service in 1988. Architecturally, the building is Beaux-Arts, designed by Warren & Wetmore and Reed & [...]

How Far Away is the Horizon?

  As I sit in my 30th storey flat, looking over a SimCity-esque grid of city buildings and rooftops, I wonder, “How far away is the horizon?” At what distance do those concrete and brick structures fade into obscurity? If I squint hard, can I see Russia? First, let us assume perfect visibility and ignore [...]

Drank, Drunk, or Dranken?

“I’ve dranken a lot more than I drank tonight.” – Ron of the Jersey Shore.   I happened upon this sound bite as I cycled through the channels, lamenting the fact that ‘there’s nothing good to watch on TV’. No, seriously, I was only flipping channels; I don’t really watch this show. It’s true! No need [...]

Sun Rays

Welcome to Fort Marinus Blogs

For my first post, I would like to share this luxurious swatch of fabric. This is Herringbone. Herringbone describes a wonderful pattern of woven fabric, so called (supposedly) because it ‘resembles the bone structure of a herring fish’. Typically uninteresting when used for woolen outerwear, as is most common, Herringbone is decidedly luxurious when used [...]

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